Greek life uses pageant to raise awareness

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Greek life uses pageant to raise awareness

Photo by: Picasa

Photo by: Picasa

Photo by: Picasa

Thibodaux (fifth from left) was crowned Miss Greek at the pageant which has a philanthropic cause.

Katrina Moses, Staff Writer

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Members of Francis Marion University’s (FMU) chapter of Kappa Delta rushed to the stormed the stage to congratulate their sister, freshman biology major Brooke Thibodaux, after she won the Miss Greek Pageant on March 25.

The Miss Greek pageant, held in the Chapman Auditorium, was hosted by FMU’s chapter of Kappa Alpha Order who put on the event to raise awareness for muscular dystrophy.

Dustin James, senior biology major, hosted the event and explained the purpose of the Miss Greek Pageant.

According to James, it was a great way to get the Greeks involved together and socialize as they come together for a cause.

“One of our big things on campus is supporting other fraternity’s and sorority’s philanthropies,” James said.  “This is us giving back to or philanthropy after a year of giving to other sorority’s and fraternity’s philanthropies,” James said.

There were eight contestants total.  The first segment of the pageant was format wear.  After this, the judges chose the final three contestants who answered questions that were randomly chosen from a bowl.

The first question, “what do you think the most important skill would be for a Zombie Apocalypse, and why,” drew laughs from the crowd.

Alexandria Lewis, freshman biology major and member of Alpha Theta Pi, answered.

“The most important skill for the Zombie Apocalypse would be to fight back,” Lew said.

The next question directed to Thibodaux was “what would your response be to a Non-Greek person that states that being in a sorority is like buying your friends.”   She responded positively, mentioning the bond that she shared with her sisters.

“I would have to say . . . if I’m buying my friends, I’m not paying enough,” Thibodaux said.  “It’s hard to explain to other people from the outside looking in, but it’s definitely an unbreakable bond between [my] sisters,”

To educate those who attended the event, a short video about muscle dystrophy was shown.  Luke Christie from Furman University was featured in this video.   He has muscular dystrophy and is a member of Kappa Delta Order who educates others on the disease.

In the video, Christie explains that muscular dystrophy is the weakening and wasting of skeletal muscles. A few of his fraternity brothers also spoke in the video and commented on how strong he is and what fundraising events they do for muscular dystrophy.

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