Andy Timmons performs during artist series

Anna Jackson, Staff Writer

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Andy Timmons, former guitarist for pop-metal band Danger Danger, visited FMU as a part of the Fine Arts Department’s artist series.

Timmons’ guitar performance took place on the evening of Feb. 9 in the Kassab Recital Hall of the Hyman Fine Arts Center.

As a member of Danger Danger, Timmons has toured with big names, like Kiss and Alice Cooper. He has also worked with Olivia Newton- John. In Timmons’ career and with Danger Danger, he sold more than one million albums and had two music videos on MTV. Today, Timmons is the guitarist for the Andy Timmons Band.

Timmons performed several of his songs and explained their meaning during the artist series. Other Andy Timmons Band members pre-recorded their parts and Timmons played them through a speaker while playing the guitar. The first of song he played was titled “Deliver Us.”

“You can attach any meaning to the music and it is able to transcend language,” Timmons said. “Music can surpass words.”

He also played a song titled “Gone,” which he composed on the day of the terrorist attacks in New York City. He recounted the events of the day and how he struggled to understand that the towers and the people were just gone. He said he wrote the song as a way to deal express his emotions.

Timmons also played instrumental covers of songs from the Beatles. He also played several of his songs from his Beatles inspired album. Before beginning to play those “tunes” he mentioned to the audience that his remakes of the Beatles’ song were done completely from his memory.

In addition to his performance, Timmons also had CDs of his music available for $15.

“I don’t know about everyone else, but the music affects me differently,” Charles Easterling, a senior chemistry major, said. “The music just went through me better, you just feel all of the intense feelings behind it.”

Easterling went on to describe why he thought it was important for events like this to take place on campus.

“People, nowadays, just don’t appreciate music like they used to,” Easterling said. “Music can affect your mood and how you feel about things. It can affect you, and I don’t think a lot of people appreciate that now.

Timmons gave audience members advice on pursuing careers in music.

“The most encouraging things I can say to any musician is that we are blessed,” Timmons said. “The world needs beauty now more than ever, and we can add to that. ”

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