FMU encourages creative writing on and offline

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FMU encourages creative writing on and offline

Eager students and faculty wait to post their thoughts and receive their stickers.

Eager students and faculty wait to post their thoughts and receive their stickers.

Photo by: Angela Acosta

Eager students and faculty wait to post their thoughts and receive their stickers.

Photo by: Angela Acosta

Photo by: Angela Acosta

Eager students and faculty wait to post their thoughts and receive their stickers.

Mary Knuckles, Staff Writer

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FMU held its annual National Day on Writing event from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Oct. 18 on the Founder’s Hall (FH) lawn. The Writing Center set up interactive tables and provided materials from participating student organizations.

According to Meredith Reynolds, associate professor of English and director of the Writing Center, the event is part of an ongoing national conversation that people are having on Twitter and other sites, encouraging people to discuss the importance of writing and creativity with words.

Reynolds encouraged students to participate by posting on social media and the boards that were set up for the event.

“We have a variety of options: you can write a six-word memoir; six words that define who you are; a two–sentence horror story; a haiku; a five-seven-five syllable poem; or you can add a sentence to our urban legend: freshmen being attacked by a late English paper and a take home statistics exam,” Reynolds said. “We have 2 hashtags: ‘#WhyiWrite’ and ‘#FMUWrites’.” We’re asking people to tag and post on social media, so they too can join the national conversation.”

Afterward, participants received a sticker, which said “National Writing Day, I wrote today, #FMUWRITES.” On the homepage of the National Day on Writing website it states that when people think of writing, they think of pencil-and-paper assignments. Jake Pack, editor for The Snow Island Review (SIR), said the purpose of this movement is for people to understand that, no matter who they are, writing is a part of their lives. It is also a part of how they work, learn, remember and communicate, he said. It gives voice to who we are and enables us to give voice to things that matters to us.

SIR, FMU’s student-run art and literary journal, participated in the event.  Pack said SIR provides students with opportunities to gain experience in what they are interested in.

“We’re all about getting our aspiring authors, artists, and photographers out and about for free. In order to join, just attend the meeting,” Pack said. “Show up to the long meetings that are once a semester. Hang out for few hours, eat some pizza, drink some soda and vote on some artistic works. We will have all of our staff and editors there and that’s where we will talk about the works that were sent in for submission. The submission deadline is the week before Thanksgiving break. You should join if you love to be a part of an encouraging group of people who indulge in people’s artistic talents.”

The next SIR meeting will be held on Nov. 28 from 5-9 p.m. in FH, in room 147A.

Sigma Tau Delta, an international collegiate honor society for students of English at 4-year colleges and universities, also participated in the event and gave materials about their organization.

To join the organization at FMU, students must have a 3.0 overall GPA; complete at least three semesters of college coursework; and successfully complete two English classes, one of which must be either English 102 or 200.

Students who are interested in SIR can contact snowislandreviewatfmu@gmail.com.

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